Mawenzi Adventures

 

TANZANIA TIPPING GUIDELINES

Like any other country, Tanzania has its own habits when it comes to tipping. In day-to-day life, it’s common to give a small tip when going to eg. a restaurant or a bar. Salaries are often relatively low and not enough to pay for life’s daily expenses without other sources of income, so tips are greatly appreciated.  

In tourism, it goes a step further, and salaries are always considered as a combination of a fixed salary and a tip. Therefore, tips are more or less obligated, and we want to be super transparent about it. 

 

TIPPING: A BIT OF BACKGROUND

Let’s start by taking away any possible doubt: yes, your guides, porters, chefs and drivers get paid a fixed salary when they work for you. The amounts vary hugely and in way too many cases, salaries are paid that are below the Tanzanian legal minimum wage. But tipping guidelines are often the same or very similar.  

So if you want to determine whether or not your guide is getting a decent salary, you should usually not compare tipping guidelines, but the companies’ policies on fixed salaries. Of course this is much less visible but please don’t be afraid to ask. 

At Mawenzi Adventures, we pay all our crew members some of the highest fixed salaries in the industry. Just because we can’t imagine any other way. And on top of that, we expect you to pay their tip according to the guidelines you’ll find below. 

So why don’t we just add them to the fixed salaries? For 4 reasons…

  • Giving a tip is a form of validation. Yes, even when tips are more or less obligated. Because of course nobody expects you to give a tip if your guide did a horrible job. 
  • If we added tips to the fixed salaries, we’d have to increase the amount to cover taxes, social security, VAT and bank fees. So you’d pay a lot more than what we ask you to pay now.
  • Nobody else does it. In itself not something that bothers us much, and we do pay higher fixed salaries than most other tour companies. But if on top of that we had to add tips to our offers, our prices would seem higher than they really are. Yes, we could mention it, but tour itineraries can be long and there’s already a huge amount of information to share, so this extra information might very well just get overlooked. And we might lose clients because they think we’re more expensive. 
  • And last but quite the opposite of least… because this is how the guides want it.  

Below we’ll give you our guidelines for how to tip our crew members to give you an idea of what’s expected. 

 

SAFARI TIPPING GUIDELINES

On all safaris except camping safaris, you’ll only be accompanied by a safari guide. There’s 1 guide per max. 6 or 7 people as that’s the maximum capacity of a safari car. The recommended tip for a safari guide is 25 USD per day, to be divided by all group members. 

On camping safaris, there’s also a cook that travels with you. He prepares your meals but also sets up your tents while you’re exploring the parks. There’s normally also 1 cook per car. The recommended tip for a cook is 15 USD per day, to be divided by all group members.

 

DAY TRIP & EXCURSION TIPPING GUIDELINES

For day trips, the number of crew members that will accompany you depends on the destination and the planned activities. Please have a look at each itinerary to have specific recommendations. 

In general, we recommend a tip of 25 USD per day for your guide and 15 USD per day in case you’re accompanied by a driver (eg. for our Hotsprings day trip). 

 

TRANSPORT TIPPING GUIDELINES

The appropriate tip for a driver depends on the duration of the drive and – in case of eg. an airport pick-up – waiting time. Please keep in mind drivers also have to get to the pick-up point and sometimes wait outside the airport for hours. We recommend a tip of 15 USD for a full day.

 

KILIMANJARO TIPPING GUIDELINES

For any Kilimanjaro climb, there’s a relatively large crew and each crew member has their own function with specific tipping guidelines. Here’s our general recommendations for each crew member, following the guidelines of the Kilimanjaro Porters Association Project

 

  • Guides: 20 – 25 USD per day per guide
  • Assistant guides: 15 – 20 USD per day per assistant guide
  • Cook: 10 – 15 USD per day per cook
  • Waiter, tent crew and summit porter: 8 – 12 USD per day per crew member (these crew members are porters with extra duties)
  • Porter: 6 – 10 USD per day per porter
 

All amounts are to be divided by all group members.

So how many crew members will accompany you on climb?

MARANGU ROUTE

The amount of crew members per climber depends on the number of climbers in your group.

1 CLIMBER

  • 1 guide
  • 1 cook
  • 2-3 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 summit porter

2 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 4-5 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 summit porter

3 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 6-7 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 summit porter

4 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 7-8 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 2 summit porters

5 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 2 assistant guides
  • 1 cook
  • 8-9 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 2 summit porters

6 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 2 assistant guides
  • 1 cook
  • 9-10 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 2 summit porters

All numbers are average estimations. Exact numbers vary based on the length of your climb (Marangu can be climbed in 5 or 6 days), the weight of your luggage, the exact weight of the food etc. We buy fresh food depending on what’s available so the total weight can vary. 

MACHAME ROUTE

The amount of crew members per climber depends on the number of climbers in your group.

Contrary to Marangu route, Machame route offers accommodation in tents, so there will be more porters as well as tent crew.

1 CLIMBER

  • 1 guide
  • 1 cook
  • 3-4 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 1 summit porter

2 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 5-6 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 1 summit porter

3 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 7-8 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 1 summit porter

4 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 8-9 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 2 summit porters

5 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 2 assistant guides
  • 1 cook
  • 9-10 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 2 summit porters

6 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 2 assistant guides
  • 1 cook
  • 10-11 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 2 summit porters

All numbers are average estimations. Exact numbers vary based on the length of your climb (Machame can be climbed in 6 or 7 days), the weight of your luggage, the exact weight of the food etc. We buy fresh food depending on what’s available so the total weight can vary. 

LEMOSHO ROUTE

The amount of crew members per climber depends on the number of climbers in your group.

Like Machame route, Lemosho route offers accommodation in tents, so there will be more porters as well as tent crew.

1 CLIMBER

  • 1 guide
  • 1 cook
  • 4-5 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 1 summit porter

2 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 6-7 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 1 summit porter

3 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 8-9 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 1 summit porter

4 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 1 assistant guide
  • 1 cook
  • 9-10 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 2 summit porters

5 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 2 assistant guides
  • 1 cook
  • 10-11 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 2 summit porters

6 CLIMBERS

  • 1 guide
  • 2 assistant guides
  • 1 cook
  • 11-12 porters
  • 1 waiter
  • 1 tent crew
  • 2 summit porters

All numbers are average estimations. Exact numbers vary based on the length of your climb (Lemosho can be climbed in 7 or 8 days), the weight of your luggage, the exact weight of the food etc. We buy fresh food depending on what’s available so the total weight can vary.